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  • Turquoise Dresser with Heavy Black Glaze - Before & After

    This dresser is among the must unique I’ve refinished. The molding around the fronts of the drawers double as the pulls!

    This dresser is painted, glazed, and distressed in Turquoise, with heavy Black Glaze on the piece. The before and after photos here capture the transformation.

    Find more inspiration in our Bedroom Furniture – Before & After collection. Or visit our Turquoise Refinished Furniture collection.

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    Turquoise Dresser Glazed Black FLF

    Turquoise Dresser with Heavy Black Glaze - Before & After

  • French Provincial Chest of Drawers painted, glazed and distressed in Antiqued White with light Tea Stained Glaze. From Facelift Furniture's DIY Blog.French Provincial Chest of Drawers painted, glazed and distressed in Antiqued White with light Tea Stained Glaze. Original pulls.
    For more DIY inspiration, visit our Chests of Drawers collection.
  • Waterfall dresser repurposed into a media console. From Facelift Furniture's DIY blog.This worn down waterfall dresser was my first experiment with converting a piece into a media console while refinishing with a painted, glazed, and distressed look.

    Part of a custom order, we decided to remove the top shelf and create a space for media components. Lowe’s Valspar “Quite Red” was selected, and I cut and attached piece of wood to serve as the shelf.

    The entire piece was painted, then lightly glazed Black. The original pulls were used for the lower drawers.

     

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    Waterfall Dresser Repurposed in Media Console - Before & After. Facelift Furniture DIY Blog
  • Retro Dining Set Re-Do! DIY Inspiration from Facelift Furniture!

    It was garage sale Saturday, and nobody wanted it. After wrapping up a week of painting, Saturday morning typically starts off with furniture hunting. This small dining set was just down the street, but I talked myself out of it because of my full plate of projects.

    Then early in the afternoon, I saw the set posted on Craigslist–half of what was asked that morning!

    After refinishing our dining chairs back in May, I’ve kept my eye for chairs that have character and great distress lines. I actually have a lot of different chairs on hand, so it made no sense to take on 4 more chairs–and a table!

    But the creative opportunity overruled reason, and this set was on it’s way to a major transformation!

    First, I removed the seat covers and glued the loose chair joints. I like using Titebond wood glue, and have learned that with any tight furniture joint, you can use card stock or a magazine cover to work the glue down into the joint to insure complete adhesion. I also used long Irwin clamps to set the joints, and left them overnight to dry.

    The chairs came with black oil cloth covers that were in good shape. So initially, my plan was to reuse them on chairs spray painted a peacock blue. The table top would be black, with the legs of the table also turquoise. After sanding the chairs lightly with a medium grit sanding sponge to remove loose finish, I cleaned them in preparation for painting. Next I spray painted the first chair–but the idea of just peacock blue didn’t last long!

    The next day, it was another blazing hot Texas afternoon, and with painting in the garage not an option, I was in Home Depot and had a little time on my hands. They sell a great line of Rust-oleum spray paints (prepare for a mouthful…) called “Painter’s Touch, Ultra Cover 2x Coverage”. And I took a few minutes to imagine how selections from the great color options could be used.

    Retro Dining Set Re-Do! DIY Inspiration from Facelift Furniture!Retro Dining Set RedoOne of the fun things about refinishing furniture is being stretched by trying out new ideas. Looking at all those paint colors, I saw a combination come together for the chairs. I bought “Eden” green and “Aubergine” purple to go with the “Lagoon” peacock blue and “Amber” yellow I already had on hand.

    When I announced my plan to Julie, she wondered if the idea was a bit out there. Honestly, I did too, but that didn’t last long after we saw the chairs painted. We were sold, and the project took on a new life.

    I also decided to paint each table leg one of the chair colors. And instead of reusing the black seat covers, we went with upholstery fabric Julie had picked up at Hobby Lobby for another chair project (still to be finished!). The funky floral print tied in great with the colors.

    Julie asked what color the table top was being painted, and I told her black. She asked if it could be changed to the dark brown found in the floral print. I had already applied a coat of Rust-oleum oil to the table, but remembered seeing a brown earlier in the week at Home Depot.

    So that evening I was back at Home Depot, and I found the brown, but it wasn’t dark enough. Explaining the project to my buddy Ramiro, who works paint, he was able to add black to the paint, and it created something between mocha and espresso. I was set!

    A week after purchasing the set, it was transformed and on display at our Saturday open house. I was surprised at what a conversation piece it was for all who came by. And within 4 days, in was sold!

    So that evening I was back at Home Depot, and I found the brown, but it wasn’t dark enough. Explaining the project to my buddy Ramiro, who works paint, he was able to add black to the paint, and it created something between mocha and espresso. I was set!
    A week after purchasing the set, it was transformed and on display at our Saturday open house. I was surprised at what a conversation piece it was for all who came by. And within 4 days, in was sold!

     

  • Turqouise & White End TableCharming distressed Antiqued White and Turquoise end table with heavy Tea-Stained Glaze.

    The top shelf is bolted to the bottom, so I took them apart and was able to cleanly paint each different colors.  I’ve found that with back and underside areas, if a part of the furniture can be removed and reattached, the job is much easier done.  With this piece, even with the distressed and shabby chic look, I like how taking it apart resulted in clean color seams between the sides and bottom surface.

    Find more inspiration in our End Tables album!

    Turqouise & White End Table top

  • White French Provincial Dresser FLFBeautiful, classic nine drawer French provincial dresser painted Antiqued White.  Lightly distressed, with light Tea Stained Glaze, creating an antiqued white look that is stunning.  This large dresser is solid wood through and through, with dovetail joint drawers that are deep and spacious.  Includes original hardware.

    For more examples of how paint, glaze, and distressing can transform old furniture, visit our DIY Inspiration album.

    White French Provincial Dresser
  • Hutch Repurposed Into Bookshelf - Before & AfterI nearly threw this one away. As a dated hutch with no matching base cabinet, there seemed no good use. Just taking up space, I finally set by our curb for trash pick up–from the photo, you can probably see why!

    I did salvage some hardware and even small cabinet doors for future creative use. As I removed those items, I noticed how the piece was made of solid wood.

    So….I couldn’t resist, and started wondering if there was any hope of converting this into a usable piece. Before I knew it, it was off the curb, back on my driveway. I pulled out my circular saw. I began to see potential for a bookshelf, but there some issues with reaching that destination.

    First, the legs which held the hutch up on it’s previous matching cabinet. Those had to go, and I removed them with my circular saw, downsizing the piece in height. The thin press board backing was still in good enough shape to use again, so I also cut it down to size.

    Next, I had to deal with the middle support running up the front side of the hutch. In the shelf area, that wood rod went up through the front edge of the second shelf, creating a square sized hole when removed. I pulled out the Durham’s Water Putty, and filled in what was missing there, as well as in holes where previous hardware had been. I also filled in a gash to the press board backing

    Hutch to Bookshelf Before

    Next came priming the shelf. One of the greatest discoveries I made when learning how to paint furniture is Zinsser Bulls Eye primer. It’s water based, and sticks to almost anything–even glossy surfaces. I still sand those kind of surfaces lightly with a medium grit sanding sponge. But after vacuuming (shop vac) and then cleaning, the piece is ready to go.

    Being water based, the primer dries fast. After an hour, it can be recoated. If a white finish with tea-stained glaze is my final goal, I’ll often apply two coats of Zinsser primer and hour apart. Then another hour later, I’ll apply the white latex paint. It’s great, because I can get 3 coats on within 3 hours (latex requires 4 hours dry time between coats, so I just do one coat of latex on top of 2 coats of primer).

    Then typically, I’ll wait a day to apply a finish such as tea-stained glaze. I’ll then wait another day to apply polyurethane. I use Zinnser’s water base poly, which just requires 2 hours dry time for recoating.

    Hutch Bookshelf After FLF

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